Buffets category

NY Times on Jersey “beefsteaks”

The New York Times has an article about “beefsteaks”, which refers to an event and not a type of food in northern New Jersey:

About 350 men, seated shoulder to shoulder at long tables, were devouring slices of beef tenderloin and washing them down with pitchers of beer. As waiters brought trays of meat, the guests reached over and harvested the pink slices with their bare hands, popping them down the hatch.

Each slice was perched on a round of Italian bread, but most of the men ate only the meat and stacked the bread slices in front of them, tallying their gluttony like poker players amassing chips. Laughter and uproarious conversation were in abundance; subtlety was not.

As anyone in northern New Jersey could tell you, this was a beefsteak.

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Vegas buffets add time limits and surcharges

An attendee of the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas noticed changes in the casino restaurants offering all you can eat deals:

This year at CES I noticed one little thing that seemed to be a universal change among most of the casinos. The buffet lines around the city have posted signs informing customers that there is now a time limit on dining. (The most extreme case we saw was a 1 hour limit on a Sushi Buffet in the Rio.) They’ve also taken to charging extra for patrons who wish to indulge in the more expensive parts of the repast.

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Chinese buffet dispute in Louisiana

(From El Toro) AOL News has an article about a dispute two diners had with the Manchuria Restaurant in Houma, Louisiana:

Houma accountant Thomas Campo said the men were charged an extra $10 each on Dec. 21 because they made a habit of dining exclusively on the more expensive seafood dishes, including crab legs and frog legs.

“We have a lot of big people there,” said Campo, who spoke for owner Li Shang, whose English is limited. “We don’t discriminate.”

Labit denied ever being told he would be asked to pay more than the standard adult price.

The argument grew heated, and police were called.

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